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TEMPORARY EXHIBITS

War and Peace Tintypes Show

Melissa Cacciola photographed fifteen men and nine women of various backgrounds, ages, and roles in the armed forces in uniform and civilian attire in an exploration of war, identity, and what serving in the armed forces means.

"War and Peace makes visible the present-day faces of those in service, a cross- section of our society that we may not often have the chance to meet. Through the tintype, our humanity-epic and small-becomes transfixed by the intrinsic characteristics of one of the earliest photographic processes," Cacciola says of her work.

Tintype portraiture dates back to the U.S. Civil War and is one of the earliest photographic processes. Its special place in military portraiture began when Matthew Brady brought his photographic darkroom to the battlefield to document the First Battle of Bull Run in 1861. Tintype portraiture dates back to the U.S. Civil War and is one of the earliest photographic processes. Its special place in military portraiture began when Matthew Brady brought his photographic darkroom to the battlefield to document the First Battle of Bull Run in 1861.

On temporary display with this show will be photography related items from the Museum's permanent collection.

The exhibit will be on display through December 1, 2014 on the Second Deck.

Weapon's Platoon: A Marine's Life in Afghanistan

"Weapon's Platoon: A Marine’s Life in Afghanistan," a photographic exhibit by Stephen Dupont, opens at the National Museum of the Marine Corps on April 4, 2012. The series of 35 photographs is a portrait of the Marine platoon Dupont was embedded with in the Spring of 2009.

"I chose to take a simple and intimate path in this project and simply asked all the Marines in the platoon to write their answers to the question 'Why are you a Marine?' in a small journal I kept while I was embedded with them. While in the field I took Polaroids of each Marine and gave them the positive as a reciprocal gesture for their participation and honesty and later, back in Sydney, printed them from the negative," Dupont explains about the project.

The Marines' answers ranged from the humorous "Why am I a Marine?" to the patriotic such as "While some people sit back and enjoy the freedom that we as Americans have, others must go out and defend it. As Marines that's what we do. America can't afford another 9/11. We as Marines not only defend our freedom, but create freedom for others….It can’t always be someone else's son."

 

 
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